Cross-akko Route

Cross-akko Route


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The Enchanted Garden and the Al-Jazzar Fortress Courtyard
This is a private garden belonging to the palace of the rulers of Akko during the Ottoman Period. To the east of the walled garden stood the rulers' palace and it was reserved for the sole use of the ruler's family. During the Crusader Period, this area was part of the Hospitaller quarter mainly populated by the military-monastic Hospitaller Order. The large ficus trees in the courtyard were most probably planted during the British Mandate Period.
 
The White Market
This is a covered market located at the entrance to the city, west of the land gate. There is a large sabil (water fountain) at its eastern façade, which provided water to all those reaching the city gates. The market was first built here by Akko's first ruler, Daher el-Omar. The market was destroyed during Napoleon Bonaparte's siege of akko and rebuilt in the early 19th century.
 
Road Split
The visitor can choose to proceed to El-Jazzar Mosque or to the sealed market.
 
Al-Jazzar Mosque
The Al-Jazzar mosque – Akko's principal mosque – was built by Al-Jazzar (1775-1801) and is  one of Israel's most important and most beautiful mosques. It is built in the center of a spacious courtyard surrounded by dozens of  study rooms as well as a Madrasah (a college for religious studies). The courtyard also contains an ancient marble sundial, the burial structure of Ahmad Al-Jazzar and his heir. The mosque is built above a large water reservoir (which is not open to visitors). At the foot of the stairs to the mosque, there is a marble purification system, which was built by Suleiman in 1814 on the occasion of the completed Kabri-Akko Aqueduct.
 
The Okashi Museum
The Okashi Museum of Art is located in Old Akko in an ancient building with cruciform domes dating back to the Ottoman Period. The Museum features rotating exhibitions of Israeli art alongside a permanent exhibit of the works of the late artist, Avshalom Okashi, who was one of Israel's most prominent painters. He spent most of his life in Akko, where he set up his painting workshop, which became the Okashi Museum posthumously.
 
The Saraya 
This is the government building where the offices of the Ottoman officials in Old Akko were located. It is an impressive building surrounding an inner courtyard, which now serves as a local community center. The Ottoman structure is built directly on the remains of St. John's Church, the main church of the Hospitaller Order in Akko dating back to the Crusader Period (13th century CE).
 
Hamam al-Basha (The Turkish Bath)
This elegant hamam dating back to the Ottoman Period was built by al-Jazzar, who was Governor of Akko in 1781-2. The hamam was destroyed in an earthquake and rebuilt in the early 19th century. It served the citizens of the Moslem city. There is another public bath in the city adjacent to the port and a private Jewish bath in the Jewish quarter next to the synagogue in the Old City. The hamam is equipped with an underground heating room that warmed up a large water basin where the steam was produced for the hamam's hot room and treatment rooms.
 
The Turkish Bazaar
This covered bazaar was built in the days of al-Jazzar (1775-1801). It served as a local municipal market for the city's inhabitants and visitors and it was a vital part of Akko's bustling, urban life in which the bazaar, the Turkish bath, the Saraya and the mosque happily coexisted. Moreover, this is where the city's inhabitants were able to have all their governmental needs met.
 
The Sealed Market 
It is located at the eastern edge of the Turkish bazaar and it was an integral part of it. This section of the bazaar was eventually abandoned and it served as a narrow, dark passageway – as part of the Old City's alleyways – hence its name.
 
The Market 
This winding shop-filled street runs from north to south of the city. This vibrant municipal market is now the core of the city's commercial life offering a colorful array of fish, butcher shops, spices, vegetables, perfumeries and souvenir shops.
 
The Ramchal Synagogue
Italian sage Rabbi Moshe Haim Luzatto settled in Akko with his family in 1743. He is best known for his moral guide, "Mesilat Yesharim" (Path of the Just). He died at the tender age of 36 of a plague that ravaged Akko. Luzatto most probably settled in the city's Jewish quarter among a small community of merchants. They even built a synagogue, which was confiscated by Dahar el-Omar (1750-1775) when he took over the city. The Jews were given an alternative building that served as a synagogue and it is still standing to this very day.
 
Haim Farchi's Home
Haim Farchi was born in 1760 in Damascus to a well-to-do family. He was recruited by Akko's ruler, al-Jazzar, as his Minister of Finance and right hand man. Haim was a gifted man, who was very instrumental in furthering the economy and Ottoman rule in the Land of Israel. As a Jew, he often represented and supported the Jews of Akko and Israel before the government and was dubbed "the Minister of the Jews". Haim Farchi was appointed to his position in 1790 and continued to serve the government for many years after al-Jazzar's death, however his Jewish descent ultimately worked against him and his family. Haim Farchi was assassinated by ruler of Akko Abdullah in 1820 and his body was cast into the sea.
 
Akko Port Marina 
Today's marina is located within Old Akko's ancient port. The Tower of Flies – the port's ancient watch tower at the edge of the former breakwater – is visible east of the southern breakwater. The port of Akko is Israel's most important ancient port: it was built during the Hellenistic Period in the 3rd century B.C. and has remained intact to this very day. The Port of Akko served as Israel's naval gate. This is where the forces of Roman Emperor Titus Flavius Vespasianus landed when they came to quell the Great Revolt. During the Middle Ages, the Port of Akko served as a vital port to which ships loaded with merchandise, fighters and pilgrims arrived from all over the Mediterranean when the Crusaders ruled Akko (1104-1291).
 
Khan al-Umdan
Khan al-Umdan is a merchants inn that was built by al-Jazzar in 1782. The khan has two floors and it is built around a central courtyard. The ground floor is where the port's customs house and the merchants' warehouses are located. The second floor housed accommodation rooms. This was the site for a similar building during the Crusader Period, but it was destroyed completely. Its name is derived from the rows of pillars surrounding the open courtyard, most of which are recycled granite taken from archeological sites such as Caesarea. In 1906, a clock tower was added to the northern façade of the khan to commemorate the silver jubilee of the rule of Ottoman sultan Abd al-Hamid II. 
 
The Templars Tunnel
The Templars were a military-monastic order who watched over the pilgrims coming from Europe to visit the holy sites of the Land of Israel. The main fortress of the Templar order was built at the western edge of the tunnel. The 350-meter long tunnel – whose lower part is carved in the natural rock and whose upper part is made of hewn stones – extends from the Templar Fortress to the port. The tunnel served as a strategic underground passageway that connected the fortress to the port.
 
Southern Sea Walls
The walls were built by Daher el-Omar in 1750, at the time of the renewed urban settlement in Akko during the Ottoman Period. The walls were severely damaged during the naval siege on the army of Egyptian ruler Muhammad Ali who took over Akko from 1832-1840. The walls were restored following this siege.
 

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